Five Friends Take the Same Photo for 30 Years

In the summer of 1982, five teenage boys sat down on a wooden bench together and posed for a group photo at Copco Lake, California. 30 years later, they’re still taking that photo. High school buddies John Wardlaw, John Dickson, Mark Rumer, Dallas Burney and John Molony made a pact: every five years, they gather together at the California lake, sit on that same bench and recreate the picture they took at 19 years old.

To begin with, a ritual was never intended: the original picture from ‘82 was taken simply to mark the vacation. Captured with a 35-millimetre camera on self-timer, the photo saw the young vacationers sporting curiously “dark and mysterious” expressions as Molony held up a Folgers Instant Coffee jar containing a live cockroach, a piece of butterscotch candy (food for the cockroach) and a photograph of Robert Young (company for the cockroach). Revisiting the lake in 1987 saw them taking the photo again, on the advice of cabin owner Wardlaw (nicknamed “Wedge”), with the same facial expressions and the same pose, and they’ve done so ever since.

Their touching tradition recently gained media attention when Dickson posted the photographs on a website dedicated to the pact. “Watch us lose hair and gain forehead, gain and lose and gain and lose weight,” Dickson posted on the site. “There are reasons we all decided it was better to take the photo with our shirts on.”

Such collective dedication makes for a heartfelt tribute to the power of friendship. But how long will this go on for? “We plan on doing this for the rest of our lives, no matter what,” says Dickson. “Up until there’s one guy just sitting in the same pose! Even then, maybe someone will take a picture of an empty bench for us.” [Read more...]

Street Stone: Classic Sculptures in Modern-Day Clothing

It’s a comical clash of classic and modern style in Street Stone, the rib-tickling new art project from Léo Caillard. In a stroke of artistic genius, the French photographer felt it necessary to bring a little modern flair to the sculptured masterpieces standing and lounging in the Louvre. In Street Stone, centuries-old statues are glammed up with the fashion of today. The inspired juxtapositions are hysterical and provoke a thought or two about the startling changes in fashion sensibilities over time. But how did Caillard do it?

In the video below, his method is shown: Caillard took some snaps of the statues, then took snaps of his friends dressed in trendy attire (plaid shirts, cropped pants, etc.) and mimicking the poses of the classic stone figures. With a little bit of photo manipulation thanks to the powers of Photoshop and some help from art director Alexis Persani, the clothes of the friends were seamlessly placed onto the stone figures’ bodies. And voila: hipster statues!

Check out the rest of Street Stone below.

The Donkey Kong-Inspired Shelving Unit

In the coin-operated, joystick-tugging, button-bashing gaming craze of the 1980s, one particular Nintendo release quickly became a bare necessity in any self-respecting amusement arcade. One of the earliest products of the platform genre, the influential and instantly popular Donkey Kong flaunted a simple concept: Jumpman, later known as Mario, must rescue a damsel in distress from the clutches of a giant ape, all while avoiding the paths of tumbling barrels and flaming fireballs.

Its setting was memorable: rows of rickety steel platforms made accessible through ladders, with villainous primate Donkey Kong always pounding away at the top of the screen. See:

This setting is the inspiration for an uber-nerdy yet super-cool shelving unit created and built by LA-based designer Igor Chak. Suitably entitled ‘Donkey Kong Wall,’ this ingeniously retro design is made of carbon fibre, anodized aluminum pixels, stainless steel rods and toughened glass tops. It is capable of supporting up to 60lbs, meaning the streams can be crossed and the more advanced games of today – or yesteryear, if you like – can be played on its sturdy surface.

A piece of interior decor like this, it’s guaranteed to induce sweet, merciful nostalgia in any hardcore frequenter of ‘80s arcades. Try your hand at Donkey Kong over at Best Online Games [Read more...]

The Dog Rider Costume: Give Your Mutt a Rider

Those long-standing boundaries between cool and cute, they’ve just been demolished. The Dog Rider Costume, manufactured by the Paper Magic Group, is a dog harness specially designed to mount your canine companion with a saddle and a rider figurine, giving your furry friend the appearance of a noble steed. The result is as adorable as it is totally awesome. There are six options for riders, as you’ll see above and below: there’s a jockey, a monkey, a cowboy, a mailman, a Lord of the Rings-esque goblin and, for Halloween, the headless horseman of Sleepy Hollow.

The harness is adjustable and fits dogs of medium to large size, with a neck that measures 17-20”. It allows you to dress up your dog all nice and pretty without getting into any trouble with the RSPCA. Handily, all Dog Rider Costumes are available on Amazon if you wish to buy one for your beloved mutt, and why wouldn’t you? It’s so cute/cool.

Here’s a tricky question: which rider is your favourite? [Read more...]

The World According to Americans

An American’s perception of the rest of the world, and indeed their own mighty nation, is a naive thing indeed. So says The World According to Americans, a comically altered map of the globe. On the evidence presented here, every country and every sea and every continent on the face of this here Earth can best be summed up with a simple cultural stereotype, vague and harsh and uninformed as it may be. The U.S. lives in the civilised world, of course. Their upstairs neighbours, they’re vegetarians. Those folks over there in Eastern Europe, they’re all commies. Africa? They’ve got AIDS. Oh, and above them? Fucking desert, dude!

The World According to Americans is designed by Bulgarian artist Yanko Tsvetkov, aka the alphadesigner. It is part of his satirical Mapping Stereotypes project, which sees him mapping out the globe with side-splitting cultural stereotypes taken from the perspectives of various different nations. You can see the rest of Mapping Stereotypes here, but I think most will agree this is the best, and funniest, entry in a tremendously hilarious project.

Check out more images from The World According to Americans below. [Read more...]