Geometric Animal Street Art by Dzia is Amazing

About two and a half years ago, a street art from Belgium called Dzia started painting murals and is already starting to get recognized and appreciated for his amazingly complex animal street art. He uses geometric lines in his unique style that really make the paintings pop out. This is especially true if the paintings are in abandoned locations. The artist usually paints in Antwerp, his hometown but some of his works can also be admired in other cities across Europe.

His works range from street works and taxidermy to sculpture and paintings. Dzia also created the Krank copyzine.

Dzia said that he was attracted to art ever since he was a little child. His entire family was very creative and his uncle was an artist. He had this passion all throughout his teenage years and eventually headed out to study art in Antwerp at the Royal Academy.

He said that after graduating, he really wanted to put his pieces on walls. He focused his attention on creating a unique style of art by making use of geometric lines and other abstract figures to create different animal shapes.

His work is appreciated all over Europe and the handmade copyzine called Krank is filled with artists that try to make their works known. Dzia started the Krank copyzine and the price of each issue depends on the costs of production. However, it comes out every four months, regardless if there are problems in the way or not.

The artists that can be found inside Krank are the people that Dzia supports, admires and even defends. In order to create Krank, Dzia got a lot of help from different artists like him. The copyzine is truly amazing and it isn’t intended only for people who admire graffiti and street art, but also for those who appreciate art altogether.

The geometric animal street art by Dzia is truly amazing.

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

geometrical animal street art

Images source: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

10 Street Artists You Should Know About

Street art is often considered a form of vandalism rather than what it actually is – an unconventional form of art.

Many artists lose themselves in a sea of canvases and a certain group of people ready to buy or view their art. Street artists use the entire world as their canvas and are not afraid of what others may think about their work.

This being said, here are 10 great street artists you should know about and some of their works. If you happen to live in a city where these works have been created, I invite you to go on a stroll around town and try to find as many graffiti art pieces by the named artist as you can.

1. Above

street artists

Above chose to have his identity concealed but he uses two signature trademarks to make people aware of his work. He began spray painting his nickname – Above on trains in 1995 and that was his first signature but because the train was moving, the word was difficult to spot so he decided to make a different signature, more noticeable. This is how his signature arrow pointing “above” appeared. Above also underwent on an international tour and you can find his works in countries like England, Portugal, France, USA and more.

2. Andre Charles

street artists

Andre Charles had the name “Zone” as his alias during the 80s but he never concealed his true identity. He began by painting graffiti on trains and walls of the Bronx but the point that made him stand out was when he started creating memorials on the walls of his neighbors and friends. After people noticed his work, he started being commissioned for it.

3. Tim Conlonstreet artists

Tim Conlon was the first street artist who had his work presented in the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. His style includes painting large murals and also working on canvas. Most of Conlon’s work can be found on the streets of Washington D.C. and in public art projects.

4. Darryl McCray

street artists

Darryl McCray also known as Cornbread is what some may call the father of modern graffiti. He was the first one who, during the 60s, started tagging Philadelphia by painting his nickname on walls. After that, a couple of friends followed him until the art movement began spreading throughout the US and then to Europe. The Mural Arts Program is the largest public art program in the US and McCray helped it become what it is today.

5. Ron English

street artists

Ron English is one of the most famous and prolific artists of our time and has art featured in books, movies and television series alongside walls and streets. The term POPaganda was assigned to his artwork and describes the high and low cultural touches present in his works. “Abraham Obama” is his most famous street artwork and it features a mix up between the portrait of Abraham Lincoln and the one of Barack Obama.

6. Mark Machado

street artists

Mark Machado is Mr. Cartoon or simply Cartoon and he is not only a street but also a tattoo artist. He began his work when he was only 8 years old and had his first paid art job by the age of 12. Machado’s graffiti work has been used by Toyota, Nike and T-Mobile to name a few and he has tattooed the bodies of many celebrities such as 50 Cent, Beyonce, Bow Wow, Prodigy and more.

7. Agata Oleksiak

street artists

Crocheted Olek is an artist who as the name suggests, uses crocheted patterns to beautify streets, inflatables and fiber art. Oleksiak’s most noticeable work is a room where everything (including the people) is covered in crocheting. You can find her work all around the world in countries such as the UK, Poland, the US or Germany.

8. Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada

street artists

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada is the founding member of the Culture Jamming movement in New York with which he started using his signature artwork on public advertising and billboards. Since 2009, he has been managing the AvantGuard Urbano Festival, held in Northern Spain.

9. Caledonia Dance Curry

street artists

Curry can also be found under the nickname Swoon and her art can be noticed on abandoned buildings all around the world. Curry’s street work features a vast collection of portraits and she uses a wheat paste method to set up her work. Swoon began her work as a street artist when she was studying painting at the Pratt Institute and decided that her art would be seen by everyone, not only by a group of people who can actually afford buying art.

10. Brad Downey

street artists

Brad Downey has appeared in the street art documentary film, Public Discourse alongside other work pieces by other street artists. In 2008, Downey was almost charged with vandalism after he spray painted the windows of KaDeWe mall, green. However, he claimed he did it to fulfill a contract he had with Lacoste. Up until today, the movement is considered a publicity stunt by Lacoste.

Do you know any other street artists or street works worth mentioning?

You Are Not Banksy: Street Art Turns Real-Life

You may know of Banksy, a British street artist of unknown identity. Based mostly in England, where he has gained much fame and infamy, Banksy specialises in darkly comic satire, both social and political, which he presents through pieces of graffiti crafted with a technique involving spray paint and stensils. His work, which has appeared on brick walls and the sides of bridges, as well as in his very own public exhibitions, is often deeply subversive and highly comical: a piece depicting a pair of canoodling policemen and another displaying a flower-lobbing hooligan are among his most famous works.

If you enjoy Banksy’s work (if not, seek help), then you may be interested in British photographer Nick Stern’s new series, entitled “You Are Not Banksy.” The project sees Stern meticulously recreating a handful of Banksy’s masterpieces using real-life models and photographing their mimicking poses. The results are extraordinary. Stern himself is a fan of the elusive guerilla street artist: “I have always admired Banksy – I love his cheek and humour,” said the London-born photographer. “Much of art is a recreation or interpretation of real life, but this is the other way round – I wanted real life to recreate art. I hope he likes what I’ve done.”

Below is Stern’s series, along with Banksy’s iconic originals for comparison. [Read more…]

A Nasty Tattoo and Other Unusual Things

The Carina Nebula.

In this week’s “around the web” segment, ThisBlogRules ventures out into the furthest reaches of our galaxy, and other galaxies, by way of a trusty telescope; it turns out our universe can be pretty spectacular. We also take a look at some creepy abandoned water parks, one particularly nasty tattoo, and we examine the undying connection between nerds and spectacles. It’s all right here in our “around the web” special; just don’t stare at that tattoo for too long – it’ll give you nightmares. [Read more…]

Realistic Art On Street Walls

British street artist Boxi is becoming more popular everyday as he takes over the streets of Germany, one wall at a time. He is most commonly known for his haunting, post-apocalyptic work, but now his work more often shows the charming touches of humanity.

[Read more…]