Top 10 Ancient Greek Artifacts

Ancient Greece was one of the civilizations that have left the biggest cultural impact on history. Whether we’re talking about their extensive mythology, the art forms, or the political innovations, there’s no denying the greatness of the Greeks. Fortunately, the physical evidence of their genius has resisted the trials of time and there are many incredible ancient Greek artifacts that are now exhibited on the shelves of many important museums around the world.

#1 Antikythera Mechanism

Ancient Greek Artifacts

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Perhaps the most fascinating of all the artifacts on this list, this mechanism is essentially an ancient analog computer, constructed by Greek scientists for calendric and astronomic purposes. It was discovered sometime around 1901 and, upon recent studies, it’s been unveiled that it was built in the 2nd century BC. The analog computer is located at the National Archeological Museum in Athens.

#2 Greek Sphinx

Surely you’re familiar with the famed Egyptian sphinx, but how much do you know about the Greek one? The statuettes were reflections of the opulence of the wealthy and their imagine consisted of the head of a woman, the body of a lion, the tail of a snake, and the wings of an eagle. The Greek sphinx originates from the civilization’s mythology, having been a fantastic creature sent by Hera to punish Thebes. It’s located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

#3 Parthenon Horse

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Ancient Greece really valued its horses, as shown by the many works of art depicting them. One particularly well-executed display of this appreciation is the Parthenon friezes, which showcase a beautifully sculpted horse head.

#4 Head of Hygeia

 The mastery of Ancient Greek sculptors is properly displayed through this fantastic and skillfully crafted marble sculpture. It depicts Hygeia, the daughter of God of Medicine Asclepius and the soon-would-be Goddess of Health. It’s believed that it was crafted sometime in the 4th century, when Hygeia worshipping really started to take off. You can find the Head of Hygeia at the National Archeological Museum of Athens.

#5 Aphrodite of Melos (Venus of Milo)

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One of the most famous works of art in history, the famed Venus of Milo sculpture received its name from the French, who retrieved the broken statue from a cavern on the island of Melos. Aphrodite was the Goddess of Love whose Roman equivalent was Venus. The statue can be admired at the Louvre Museum from Paris.

#6 Head of Zeus

The person whose image was sculpted was up for debate for a while, with its original name referring to the possibility of it being Poseidon. However, upon further archeological investigations, a consensus concluded that it was the figure of the almighty Greek deity.

#7 Hecate

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The name was given to the Greek goddess trinity that was said to rule over Heaven, Earth, and the Underworld. She is heavily based off another deity, this time, an Egyptian one, going by the name Hekat. Most often, the trinity is said to have consisted of Hecate Selene, the Moon in Heaven, Persephone the Destroyer of the Underworld, and Artemis the Goddess of Hunting. The statuette can be admired at Metropolitan Museum of Art from New York.

#8 Bust of Apollo

Apollo was another important deity in Greek mythology. Son of Zeus and Leto, as well as a brother of the previously mentioned Artemis, Apollo’s most important contribution was his role as an oracle. At times, he would grant the gift of sightseeing to others as well, a worthy example being Cassandra from Troy.

#9 Pan Statue

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Pan was essentially the underdog of the Greek deities, majorly because of his distorted appearance and his half-man, half-goat physical traits. Much like Dionysus, Pan was associated with hedonism of all kinds and, because of it, he was named Pan, a Greek word that means “all.”

#10 Head of Hermes

After the sculpture was discovered in 1926, it was taken to the National Museum of Athens. Archeologists have all agreed that the harmonic lines in the statue stand as testimony that it may have been the work of Praxiteles, one of the greatest sculptors of the 4th century BC.

Street Stone: Classic Sculptures in Modern-Day Clothing

It’s a comical clash of classic and modern style in Street Stone, the rib-tickling new art project from Léo Caillard. In a stroke of artistic genius, the French photographer felt it necessary to bring a little modern flair to the sculptured masterpieces standing and lounging in the Louvre. In Street Stone, centuries-old statues are glammed up with the fashion of today. The inspired juxtapositions are hysterical and provoke a thought or two about the startling changes in fashion sensibilities over time. But how did Caillard do it?

In the video below, his method is shown: Caillard took some snaps of the statues, then took snaps of his friends dressed in trendy attire (plaid shirts, cropped pants, etc.) and mimicking the poses of the classic stone figures. With a little bit of photo manipulation thanks to the powers of Photoshop and some help from art director Alexis Persani, the clothes of the friends were seamlessly placed onto the stone figures’ bodies. And voila: hipster statues!

Check out the rest of Street Stone below.

Mind-Blowing Lego Art Creations by Nathan Sawaya

Lego art isn’t anything new – ever since the Lego Group launched the interlocking building blocks all the way back in 1949, budding artists the world over have been presenting their colourful constructions in galleries, on the internet and even out in the open. But the Lego creations of New York-based artist Nathan Sawaya are so eye-poppingly spectacular and spectacularly eye-popping they deserve to have some light shone upon their countless interconnected bricks.

Ever since 2002, ex-laywer Sawaya has been creating large-scale sculptures of the human body, everyday objects and real-life constructions, all made entirely out of regular ol’ Lego bricks, and has been showcasing them in museums all across the globe. Currently, he is touring the States and also Australia in a new exhibition, named “The Art of the Brick,” wowing museum-goers worldwide with his magnificent designs. Below is a collection of some of his finest work, but if you want to see more you could go take a look at his official site or even pay one of his exhibitions a visit – just don’t knock any of the pieces over. [Read more…]

Incredible Tiny Sculptures Made On Pencil Tips

Get your magnifying glass, you're gonna need it to see this collection of miniature sculptures! The person who made theses sculptures has a lot of patience and intestinal fortitude. Carving tiny artwork on pencil tips is not for the weak.

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Mini-Worlds In Jars

So, you've seen lots and lots of incredible miniature art over the years, but I highly doubt you've ever seen miniature art going to this extreme! The contents of the little containers depicted above and below are so petite you need a magnifying glass to actually see what objects they are supposed to be. And prepare to be amazed once you take a magnified peek because every little jar has a tiny world of brilliance sitting inside. One world shows a couple kissing under a tree, another shows a turtle on an island, and a third shows a golf course with one itsy-bitsy golfer playing a round; maybe he's a Lilliputian.

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