Charles Bronson Prisoner: Astounding Facts

If you don’t live in the UK and you haven’t seen the movie “Bronson”, you might be a little in the dark about this character. Long story short, Bronson is Britain’s most notorious, problem prisoner, known for his unstable behavior, and instigator nature. Charles Bronson Prisoner: Astounding Facts reviews the weird things that you didn’t know about his multiple faces: the Charles Bronson convict, the Charles Bronson criminal and the artist within Charles Bronson. Despite his crimes, Bronson is (was?) an articulated, extravagant man with a quick temper. But according to himself, he is a nice guy who only occasionally becomes nasty, which doesn’t necessarily mean he’s evil.

5. Went in for 7 years, spent more than 40

Charles Bronson Prisoner: Astounding Facts

After being arrested for stealing $43 in 1974, Michael Peterson became known as Charles Bronson prisoner. He was a problematic inmate from the very start and engaged in countless violent acts. In 40 years of imprisonment he stayed in more than 120 prisons across England. He attacked over twenty guards, more prisoners than anyone could count and managed to take eleven hostages. During all these bizarre acts he caused damages that surpassed half a million pounds.

4. Elevated protests

Charles Bronson Prisoner: Astounding Facts

After he was declared mentally insane in 1978, Bronson was moved to Broadmoor Hospital where he was allegedly mistreated and received medication against his will. As a consequence, he reached the rooftop of the building and protested there for almost a week before his brother convinced him to come down. After this episode he was declared sane and was released from Broadmoor. But he carried on his tradition and repeated the rooftop riots on five more occasions in five different prisons.

3. He cared about his biceps

Charles Bronson Prisoner: Astounding Facts

If you’ve heard about the Charles Bronson prison workout, you’re probably wondering what’s all the hype about. He was really into sport and keeping fit and wanted to prove anyone can get ripped without splurging on supplements, counting calories or spending hours on machines. So he wrote the Charles Bronson Solitary Fitness book, in which he talks about his technique, the Solitary Cow Punch, which he claims will help you kick down steel doors. Come to think about it, there may be some truth in there about this deadly technique. It’s been reported that he bent steel doors with his bare hands and there’s even a story about him doing 2000 push ups every day. If you want to try the Charles Bronson workout routine, make sure to skip his other recommendations like flossing your nostrils with twine.

2. Charles Bronson Art

Charles Bronson Prisoner: Astounding Facts

Bronson had enough time to experiment with many things, like painting and writing poetry. He even won some awards for art after his works where illegally displayed on the London Underground, followed by their publication in various newspapers. His art teacher, Phil Danielson, and him became very close until one day when Danielson openly criticized one of his pupil’s painting. This threw Bronson in a fit of rage and he tied his teacher with skipping rope, making a spear from a knife and pool cue with which he tantalized his victim, while he muttered to himself and giggled. Danielson was held hostage for 44 hours and Bronson got himself the life sentence.

1. Is charles bronson still alive?

Charles Bronson Prisoner: Astounding Facts

The last we’ve heard about Bronson was in May 2014 when he got hot under the collar while watching Arsenal playing against Hull. After claiming to have seen Ronnie Kray’s ghost who encouraged him to start a riot, he stripped all his clothes and covered himself in butter, to make it harder for the guards to restrain him. He injured more than a dozen prison guards, just for fun. And with this, we’re left with the question is Charles Bronson dead? Or will we be seeing him on the news, on the rooftop of another prison once more?

Image sources 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Leave a Reply