Powerful Symbols And Meanings of Celtic, Viking and Japanese Culture


Cultures all over the globe are filled with meaningful and magical symbols that most of the time attract our curiosity. Find out about the powerful symbols and meanings of Celtic, Viking and Japanese culture, that you have seen for sure but don’t know what they actually stand for.

The Celtic mythology is a realm marked by misterious and  strange looking signs. Here are some of the Celtic symbols and meanings that you might find interesting.



The word is a Greek term, which means “three legged”, and if you look closely at the sign, it does look like three legs running. The meaning of this Celtic symbol stands for competition  and the progress of man.



The word comes from Latin and means “three cornered” and it represents a holy symbol with many meanings. It is a symbol composed of three interlocked pisces, stressing on the intersection of three circles. Most often it used as a symbol for the Holy Trinity, used by the Celtic Christian Church and sometimes it can be found as three interlaced fish.

 Triple Spiral


The triple spiral is a symbol found in many Celtic tombs, and is drawn as one continuous line, implying rebirth or resurrection. The theory of its meaning comes from the fact that many of these drawings have been found in places where they catch the first sun rays on the solstice, and  they appear to have been placed there intentionally.

Celtic Tree of Life

tree good

The Tree was an important part of the early Celtic spirituality. For the Celts, the tree was a  a source of living, a bearer of food, a shelter and fuel provider for cooking and keeping warm. Without the existence of trees, living  would have been almost impossible.

Celtic stories, say that trees were the ancestors of mankind, beings of wisdom who created the alphabet, the calendar and the entrance to the land of the Gods.


shamrock powerful symbol

Today is considered a good luck charm but the shamrock has a much deeper meaning. The Druids, believed that is represented a three in one concept, of the three dominions on the planet, sky and sea and the ages of humans and the stages of the moon. In the Celtic folklore, the Shamrock stands as a symbol against evil, a belief that has been carried on till present days,as the four leafed clover is used as a good luck charm.



A Celtic cross represents a cross with a ring which surrounds the intersection. The symbol is associated with the Celtic Christianity even though it has much older origins. Crosses like such are part of a large Celtic art. A Celtic cross, standing, made out of stone and usually with lots of ornaments, is called a high cross or an Irish Cross. In Ireland, a popular myth says that the celtic cross was brought by Saint Patrick or maybe Saint Declan while he was converting the pagan Irish people.

The Green Man

greenman symbol

The Green Man is believed to be an ancient Celtic symbol. In the Celtic mythology he is the God of Spring and Summer. He is believed to disappear and come back every year, century after century, enacting death and resurrection and the circle of life.  The  legend of Sir Gawain, The Green Knight, is an obvious image of the Green Man from the Middle Ages. Gawain is wearing a green helmet, green armour and a green shield but also a green horse. After he was beheaded he continued to live on.

Symbols and meanings belonging to Vikings

Vikings have had a lot a lot of symbols with plenty of sacred or mystical meanings and many of them have very interesting looks.

 The Triple Horn of Odin


This Viking symbol is made out of three interlocked drinking horns and is usually worn or displayed as a proof of commitment to the modern faith Asatru.



Yggdrasil, the Norse World Ash, is the giant mythic tree that holds together the Nine Worlds or lands of existence.  The World-ash stands for the Nine Worlds and is protected by the Jormungadr serpent. Yggdrasil is one the of plenty variations of the Universal World Tree, known to all the human cultures.

 The Julbock

Straw Goat - 4" julbock

The Julbock also known as the Yule-goat is a universal symbol of the winter holidays in the Scandinavian countries.  Going back in the pre-christian times, the Julbock is yet another Pagan Yule symbol, that was taken by the Christian holiday holiday customs. In the pagan Norse religion, a goat represented the conveyance of the gods-early representations of Odin in a goat drawn cart, strangely similar to further portrayals of Santa Claus.

 Troll Cross

troll cross

The troll cross is some sort of amulet consisting of a circle of iron crossed at the base. The charm has been worn by early Scandinavian people to protect themselves against trolls and elves. Iron and crosses were believed to be a combination that casts away evil spirits.



The symbol it is known as the Valknut, meaning “a knot of slain”, and it has been found in stone funerary carvings, which most probably was meant to represent the after life. The signs is often found in the art portraying god Odin, and it may represent his power over death.

 The Helm of Awe

 The Helm of Awe

The Helm of Awe, is a protection against spells used by early Vikings. Some legends say that, when worn between the eyes, this protective symbol, was meant to offer invincibility to the one who was wearing it or make the enemy fearful.

 Thor’s Hammer

Thor Hammer

Thor’s Hammer, stands for an ancient Norse symbol, and represents the legendary magical weapon of Thor. Also known as Mjolnr, which means “lightning”, symbolised Thor’s power over Lightning and Thunder. The Hammer or Thor, was said to always come back after it has been thrown.

A Thor Hammer amulet has been often worn by believers who thought that it would protect them, and the practice continued even after the Norse population had converted to Christianity. Modern times use it as a sign of recognition of members belonging to the Asatru faith, and is symbolic of Norse heritage.

 Japanese symbols and meanings

Japan is another country with many symbols that are related to its national culture and magical beliefs.

 Japanese Dragons

Japanese Dragons

Japanese symbols of dragons are very similar to Chinese dragons, with the exception that the Japanese dragon has only three claws or toes, while the Chinese dragon has five and the common dragon ahs four claws. There are two types of Japanese dragons, one lives in the sky or clouds and the other is found in water or rain. It is believed that dragons are controlling rain, fire and Earth. Most known Japanese words for dragons are ryu and tatsu.



Japanese culture sees butterflies as the souls of the living and the dead and are considered to symbolize happiness and longevity.


koi carp

The carp(koi) represents perseverance and is also a symbol of faithfulness in marriage and good luck. It is often shown in motion, arched upwards with water sprays. This suggests the virtues of a great warrior and is usually associated with the qualities desired in young men.

 Cherry Blossoms


Starting from the Heian Period, cherry blossoms have been revered by Japanese culture.The brief blooming of the flowers and the fragility of its blossoms has been associated with the transience of life.



In the Japanese symbolism, dragons flies are an emblem of martial success, as several names for the insects are homonyms for words which mean victory. Dragonflies are also a symbol for late summers and early autumns.



Turtles are a complex motif of Japanese culture. Taoism, Hinduism, Confucianism and Buddhism are all beliefs that promote understanding and are all claiming that the turtle helps prop up the world, is a guardian of the northern quadrant of the Universe, together with the snake, and carries its sacred carapace inscriptions.



Many symbols of the Japan have been assimilated from China, and Chinese symbols and meanings, are widely present in the Japanese culture. Chrysanthemums were believed to have healing powers for excessive drinking, nervousness and debilitating diseases. Chinese culture associates the flower with integrity and endurance.

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About Fred Mitchell

I like midnight surfing and going for jogs at sunrise with my my golden retriever, Charlie. When I'm not studying Russian literature or reading Dostoievski, you can find me playing video games like Witcher 3 or Battlefield Hardline, or hanging out in Starbucks sipping an Americano. I never leave the house without my phone and saying I am a social media addict would definitely not be an understatement.

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